Menu
Subscribe
Miami Minimally Invasive Valves
Joseph Lamelas, MD
Dedicated to the Advancement of Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery
X

Tricuspid Valve Surgery

When performing a minimally invasive AVR or MVR via a right mini-thoracotomy approach, assessing whether you are in the right interspace is sometimes questionable.  Even after performing thousands of cases, I question this at times. I have come to the conclusion that there is one landmark that I need to see in order to confirm that I have entered the correct interspace.  That structure is the Right Superior Pulmonary Vein.

During a mini AVR, after instituting CPB and opening the pericardium, if I see the RSPV directly in line with interspace that I entered, I know that I should be able to perform the operation, even if the aorta is displaced. It is key to then take your time and place as many pericardial stay sutures as needed to develop the exposure. This is crucial to optimizing the exposure. (TOP picture)

During a mini MVR, after instituting CPB and opeing the pericardium, if I see the RSPV directly in line with the interspace that I entered, or one interspace above the site that I entered, I know that I am in the correct interspace. I don’t what to be in line with the IVC. This will be very low and if this were the case, I would move to the next higher interspace. Again, use the pericardial stay sutures to optimize exposure. (BOTTOM picture)

Mini AVR

Mini AVR

Mini MVR

Mini MVR

 

I have enclosed a link to the Annals of Cardiothoracic Surgery.
I have submitted 4 publications to this journal that I would like for all of you to review.
Two are relevant to Minimally Invasive AVR/MVR, one on Minimally Invasive AVR, and one on Building a Minimally Invasive Valve Program, of which I was a co-author with Dr. Tom Nguyen.
In addition, I think that all of the contributions to this journal are significant and will help advance the subspecialty of minimally invasive valve surgery.
I urge all to subscribe.
There are previous editions of this journal which are excellent and I believe serve as a reference for all Cardiothoracic Surgeons.
www.annalscts.com

Over the years I have modified my technique for inserting the post for the atrial lift system.  Believe it or not,  patients were complaining about pain from this insertion site more than from the mini thoracotomy incision.

In the past I was making a small incision in the chest where I wanted to insert the post and thereafter passed a tonsil clamp from the incision and into the chest. I would then take a red rubber catheter , place it through the thoracotomy incision and pull it out through the small incision.  I would then use the red rubber catheter to guide the post back into the chest and later attach it to the blade.  I think that maybe the insertion of the clamp was just too traumatic.

Please view this short video to see the new technique that I strongly recommend.  I have provided the link below. (When you view it,  click on settings, which is the little pin wheel on the lower bar, third from the right.  This is the settings button. Click Quality and the select 720 HP. The resolution will be better)

If anyone has any suggestions or a better way, I would appreciate any comments.

 

As I have mentioned in a previous blog, I have been getting more comfortable with using Del Nido Cardioplegia.

I have enclosed the components that we utilize.

We use a 4:1, blood: cardioplegia ratio

I believe that it has been described using a 1:4 ratio.

I usually deliver a 2 liter induction dose and then I give an additional 500cc , 45-55 minutes later.

I would recommend not giving an additional dose within 20 minutes of unclamping because I have noticed that the heart is a bit more stunned and takes longer to resume electrical activity.

1 liter of Plasmalyte or Isolyte or Normasol

Mannitol 20% 16 mL
Magnesium 2 g 4 mL
KCL 35 mEq
Sodium Bicarbonate 13 mL
Lidocaine 2% 6.5 mL

I usually end up using approximately 2 liters of this cardioplegia because I also utilize this solution to irrigate the aortic root and LV after debriding the calcium or for testing my mitral valve repair.